Tim Brunson DCH

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The effect of music therapy on physiological signs of anxiety in patients...



Full title: The effect of music therapy on physiological signs of anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support.

AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate if relaxing music is an effective method of reducing the physiological signs of anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support. BACKGROUND: Few studies have focused on the effect of music on physiological signs of anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support. DESIGN: A study-case-control, experimental repeated measures design was used. METHOD: Sixty patients aged 18-70 years, receiving mechanical ventilatory support and hospitalised in the intensive care unit, were taken as a convenience sample. Participants were randomised to a control group or intervention group, who received 60 minutes of music therapy. Classical music was played to patients using media player (MP3) and headphones. Subjects had physiological signs taken immediately before the intervention and at the 30th, 60th and 90th minutes of the intervention. Physiological signs of anxiety assessed in this study were mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation in blood measured by pulse oxymetry. Data were collected over eight months in 2006-2007. RESULTS: The music group had significantly lower respiratory rates, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, than the control group. This decrease improved progressively in the 30th, 60th and 90th minutes of the intervention, indicating a cumulative dose effect. CONCLUSION: Music can provide an effective method of reducing potentially harmful physiological responses arising from anxiety. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: As indicated by the results of this study, music therapy can be supplied to allay anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Nurses may include music therapy in the routine care of patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

J Clin Nurs. 2011 Apr;20(7-8):1026-34. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03434.x. Epub 2011 Feb 16. Korhan EA, Khorshid L, Uyar M. Department of Fundamentals of Nursing, School of Nursing, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey. akinesra80@hotmail.com

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