Tim Brunson DCH

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Effects of music on auditory hallucination and psychiatric symptoms in people with schizophrenia



Full Title: Effects of listening to music on auditory hallucination and psychiatric symptoms in people with schizophrenia

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of listening to music in inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia, on their auditory hallucinations, and positive and negative symptoms. METHODS: A quasi-experimental research design with 2x2 cross-over trial and convenience sample was used. Eleven patients (Group AB) listened to music followed by a wash out period and then a usual care period, and 12 patients (Group BA) had a usual care period followed by a wash out period and then listened to music. For one week those who were in the experimental period listened to individualized music using an MP3 player whenever they heard hallucinations. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant decrease in the frequency of auditory hallucinations after listening to the music. There was a decrease in the mean scores for positive symptoms, negative symptoms, and general psychopathology after listening to music, but only negative symptoms showed a statistically significant decrease. The treatment effects on scores for positive symptoms, negative symptoms, and general psychopathology were greater in Group BA than Group AB. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that listening to music may be useful for managing auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia inpatients.

J Korean Acad Nurs. 2009 Feb;39(1):62-71. Na HJ, Yang S. College of Nursing, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

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