Tim Brunson DCH

Welcome to The International Hypnosis Research Institute Web site. Our intention is to support and promote the further worldwide integration of comprehensive evidence-based research and clinical hypnotherapy with mainstream mental health, medicine, and coaching. We do so by disseminating, supporting, and conducting research, providing professional level education, advocating increased level of practitioner competency, and supporting the viability and success of clinical practitioners. Although currently over 80% of our membership is comprised of mental health practitioners, we fully recognize the role, support, involvement, and needs of those in the medical and coaching fields. This site is not intended as a source of medical or psychological advice. -- Tim Brunson, PhD

Relationship Attachment Styles (Part 3)



by Richard Yates MS, LPC, NCC, NBCFCH

SATISFACTION VS DISSATISFACTION

Our level of satisfaction in a relationship has as much to do with our personality characteristics as the relationship itself. The "International Personality Item Pool Representation of the NEO PI-R™" or IPIP-NEO is a personality test that is available online at http://www.personal.psu.edu/j5j/IPIP/> . Personality psychologists have identified five dimensions of personality that are commonly referred to as the "Big Five", based on the "five-factor theory" of personality. These include "extraversion", "agreeableness", "conscientiousness", "neuroticism" and "openness". These traits are measured by the IPIP-NEO and they are powerful indicators of how we view and interact with others.

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Relationship Attachment Styles (Part 2)



by Richard Yates MS, LPC, NCC, NBCFCH

So, the independents, in my view, fall into these two categories; productive or unproductive. The same will be true for the dependent attachment styles. The productive independents veer toward the autonomous styles of attachment. The unproductive fall into the avoidant types of attachment.

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Relationship Attachment Styles (Part 1)



by Richard Yates MS, LPC, NCC, NBCFCH

A number of factors contribute to the ways we connect and bond to relationship partners. Genes that are passed down from our parents can impact who we desire and how we attach to them. For example, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) gene cluster can be unconsciously detected by a woman, particularly during ovulation. Through her heightened sense of smell she can tell if a man's immune system will complement her own to ensure healthy children (see Rachel Hertz, Ph.D, "Scent of Desire"). The thoughts, behaviors and emotions of our parents also weigh heavy in our romantic bonds. Michael Meaney, PhD at McGill University's Department of Neurology discovered that when he switched rat pups from a calm rat mother to a nervous rat mother, the pups expressed the genes of the mother they were with and also became anxious. Conditions in our childhood environments and the children we played with helped form our personal relationship behaviors. A child who is abandoned by her parents at age 3 may be more likely to fear abandonment by a relationship partner as an adult than a child from a perfect home environment. Biological factors can also influence how we function in relationships. Low IQ, brain injuries or abnormalities as well as disease often limit the ability to form a relationship bond. As in the case of autism, a person may not value a relationship partner above a computer. So, how we attach to relationship partners is affected by many factors.

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