Tim Brunson DCH

Welcome to The International Hypnosis Research Institute Web site. Our intention is to support and promote the further worldwide integration of comprehensive evidence-based research and clinical hypnotherapy with mainstream mental health, medicine, and coaching. We do so by disseminating, supporting, and conducting research, providing professional level education, advocating increased level of practitioner competency, and supporting the viability and success of clinical practitioners. Although currently over 80% of our membership is comprised of mental health practitioners, we fully recognize the role, support, involvement, and needs of those in the medical and coaching fields. This site is not intended as a source of medical or psychological advice. -- Tim Brunson, PhD

A qualitative study of mindfulness-based meditation therapy in Japanese cancer patients.



PURPOSE: The primary objective of the study was to examine mindfulness-based meditation therapy qualitatively. A secondary goal was to examine the differences in themes selected by Japanese and Western patients receiving this therapy. METHODS: The subjects were 28 patients who were undergoing anti-cancer treatment. The subjects participated in two sessions of mindfulness-based meditation therapy, including breathing, yoga movement, and meditation. Each patient was taught the program in the first session, then exercised at home with a CD, and subsequently met the interviewer in a second session after 2 weeks. Primary physicians recruited the patients and interviews were conducted individually by nurses or psychologists with training in the program. Patients provided answers to pre- and post-intervention interviews about the meaning of their illness. RESULTS: Narrative data from the semi-structured interview were analyzed qualitatively. Pre-intervention, themes such as "Effort to cope," "Looking back," "Spirituality," "Personal growth," and "Suffering" were often chosen. Post-intervention, themes such as "Adapted coping," "Personal growth," "Positive meaning," "Spirituality," and "Negative recognition" were more commonly chosen. CONCLUSIONS: Mindfulness-based meditation therapy may be effective for producing adapted coping, including positive recognition and changes for an adapted lifestyle. There were some common aspects and some differences in the themes selected by patients in this study and Western patients received mindfulness therapy in other studies.

Support Care Cancer. 2011 Jul;19(7):929-33. Epub 2010 May 16. Ando M, Morita T, Akechi T, Ifuku Y. Faculty of Nursing, St. Mary's College, Tsubukuhonmachi 422, Kurume City, Fukuoka, Japan, andou@st-mary.ac.jp.

TrackBacks
There are no trackbacks for this entry.

Trackback URL for this entry:
http://www.hypnosisresearchinstitute.org/trackback.cfm?8FE5559D-EB05-52D3-42E9A071565E6119

Comments
© 2000 - 2019The International Hypnosis Research Institute, All Rights Reserved.

Contact